August 21, 2013   2 notes

The Kickstarter campaign to fund the Sanctuary Stories project has already raised $2,055!!

Wow! Thank you!

Tomorrow I am shooting at The Farm Sanctuary in Orland. This will be our second trip to that amazing place. On the agenda is to photograph one of the resident goats, and also an aged beef cow. 


Still a long way to go to finish this project. 

Please help by sharing it with your friends, enemies, co-workers, neighbors and family. 

And consider making a pledge, no matter how small.

Thank You!

http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/carolineschiff/stop-factory-farming-of-animals

August 20, 2013
June 28, 2013   36 notes
Lucy: A piglet.
Only four months old, Lucy has been through a lot already. 

It seems she escaped from a farm auction, where piglets as young as 2-3 days old are sold for a few dollars.

Running loose, she was picked up by an animal control agency. The agency then auctioned off Lucy to the highest bidder. As legal animal caretakers, the agency should have been trying to find a permanent home for her. 

Sadly, the practice of auctioning off farmed animals instead of adopting them out is common.

Instead, the animal control agency was only interested in getting the highest fee for her. They refused offers from animal sanctuaries for being too low. A bidding war ensued between sanctuaries - all of whom were only interested in saving her life. 

Lucy was eventually adopted by the Animal Place in Grass Valley, CA.


(c) 2013. All rights reserved.
Caroline Schiff Photography: www.carolineschiff.com

Lucy: A piglet.

Only four months old, Lucy has been through a lot already. 
It seems she escaped from a farm auction, where piglets as young as 2-3 days old are sold for a few dollars.
Running loose, she was picked up by an animal control agency. The agency then auctioned off Lucy to the highest bidder. As legal animal caretakers, the agency should have been trying to find a permanent home for her. 
Sadly, the practice of auctioning off farmed animals instead of adopting them out is common.
Instead, the animal control agency was only interested in getting the highest fee for her. They refused offers from animal sanctuaries for being too low. A bidding war ensued between sanctuaries - all of whom were only interested in saving her life. 
Lucy was eventually adopted by the Animal Place in Grass Valley, CA.

(c) 2013. All rights reserved.

Caroline Schiff Photography: www.carolineschiff.com

June 21, 2013   24 notes
Lulu: Hen rescued from a factory egg-farm.
Before rescue, Lulu would have lived in a battery cage. In poultry farming, battery cages are an industrial agricultural confinement system used primarily for egg-laying hens. The name comes from the lines of similar cages connected together, sharing common divider walls.
(c) 2013. All rights reserved.
Caroline Schiff Photography: www.carolineschiff.com

Lulu: Hen rescued from a factory egg-farm.

Before rescue, Lulu would have lived in a battery cage. In poultry farming, battery cages are an industrial agricultural confinement system used primarily for egg-laying hens. The name comes from the lines of similar cages connected together, sharing common divider walls.

(c) 2013. All rights reserved.

Caroline Schiff Photography: www.carolineschiff.com

June 21, 2013   10 notes

The greatness of a nation and its moral progress can be judged by the way in which its animals are treated.


― Gandhi

June 21, 2013   161 notes
Theo, a male Holstein who would have been killed for veal. Taken from his mother after birth, he would lived his short life confined to a veal crate.
Tethered by their necks to further restrict their movement, they’re virtually immobilized for their entire 16-week long lives. Unfortunately, this confinement is common in the veal industry, despite overwhelming scientific evidence that it’s inhumane and at odds with public opinion.
(c) 2013. All rights reserved.
Caroline Schiff Photography: www.carolineschiff.com

Theo, a male Holstein who would have been killed for veal. Taken from his mother after birth, he would lived his short life confined to a veal crate.

Tethered by their necks to further restrict their movement, they’re virtually immobilized for their entire 16-week long lives. Unfortunately, this confinement is common in the veal industry, despite overwhelming scientific evidence that it’s inhumane and at odds with public opinion.

(c) 2013. All rights reserved.

Caroline Schiff Photography: www.carolineschiff.com

June 21, 2013   2 notes
June 21, 2013   23 notes

It shouldn’t be the consumer’s responsibility to figure out what’s cruel and what’s kind, what’s environmentally destructive and what’s sustainable. Cruel and destructive food products should be illegal. We don’t need the option of buying children’s toys made with lead paint, or aerosols with chlorofluorocarbons, or medicines with unlabeled side effects. And we don’t need the option of buying factory-farmed animals.

― Jonathan Safran Foer, Eating Animals

June 21, 2013   30 notes
Leo: a rooster.
Male chicks are usually killed shortly after hatching.
Chick culling is the culling of newly hatched poultry for which breeders have no use. In an industrial egg-producing facility, about half of the newly hatched chicks will be male and would grow up to be roosters, which do not lay eggs and therefore provide no incentive for the breeder to preserve. 
(c) 2013. All rights reserved.
Caroline Schiff Photography: www.carolineschiff.com

Leo: a rooster.

Male chicks are usually killed shortly after hatching.

Chick culling is the culling of newly hatched poultry for which breeders have no use. In an industrial egg-producing facility, about half of the newly hatched chicks will be male and would grow up to be roosters, which do not lay eggs and therefore provide no incentive for the breeder to preserve. 

(c) 2013. All rights reserved.

Caroline Schiff Photography: www.carolineschiff.com

June 21, 2013   11 notes
Dakota: A male turkey rescued from a factory farm.
Like many farm birds, the tip of his beak has been shaved off. 
To reduce the harmful effects of pecking, most chicks going into battery cages are beak-trimmed. This is often performed on the first day after hatching, simultaneously with sexing and receiving vaccinations. Beak-trimming is a procedure considered by many scientists to cause acute pain and distress with possible chronic pain; it is practised on chicks for all types of housing systems.
(c) 2013. All rights reserved.
Caroline Schiff Photography: www.carolineschiff.com

Dakota: A male turkey rescued from a factory farm.

Like many farm birds, the tip of his beak has been shaved off. 

To reduce the harmful effects of pecking, most chicks going into battery cages are beak-trimmed. This is often performed on the first day after hatching, simultaneously with sexing and receiving vaccinations. Beak-trimming is a procedure considered by many scientists to cause acute pain and distress with possible chronic pain; it is practised on chicks for all types of housing systems.

(c) 2013. All rights reserved.

Caroline Schiff Photography: www.carolineschiff.com

June 20, 2013   10 notes

Animals are my friends…and I don’t eat my friends.


― George Bernard Shaw

June 20, 2013
June 20, 2013   2 notes
Sophia: A rescued “bummer” lamb, now grown. Bummers are the smallest lamb or lambs resulting from a set of triplets or quadruplets. They are often discarded.
(c) 2013. All rights reserved.
Caroline Schiff Photography: www.carolineschiff.com

Sophia: A rescued “bummer” lamb, now grown. Bummers are the smallest lamb or lambs resulting from a set of triplets or quadruplets. They are often discarded.

(c) 2013. All rights reserved.

Caroline Schiff Photography: www.carolineschiff.com

June 20, 2013   5 notes

If slaughterhouses had glass walls, everyone would be a vegetarian.

Paul McCartney

June 20, 2013   489 notes
Stanley: Rescued beef calf, 5 months old.
Every year, 33 million calves like him are branded, castrated without pain relief, and then sent to feedlots, where they remain for their short lives. Stanley is an Angus, the most common type of cow raised for slaughter, and he would have been killed at age two.
(c) 2013. All rights reserved.
Caroline Schiff Photography: www.carolineschiff.com

Stanley: Rescued beef calf, 5 months old.

Every year, 33 million calves like him are branded, castrated without pain relief, and then sent to feedlots, where they remain for their short lives. Stanley is an Angus, the most common type of cow raised for slaughter, and he would have been killed at age two.

(c) 2013. All rights reserved.

Caroline Schiff Photography: www.carolineschiff.com